The Coalition for Gun Control/Pour le Controle des Armes

Posts Tagged ‘Gun Registry’

No registering of unrestricted sniper rifles?

Posted by cgccanada on May 18, 2010

The Steyr-Mannlicher HS .50 is classified as an “unrestricted” sniper rifle in Canada. It is reported that “it can pierce light armour from a distance of up to 1.5 kilometres.” It can also be legally acquired in Canada by anyone with a valid firearms license.

The Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security is currently hearing witnesses on Bill C-391. If passed, this Bill will repeal the requirement to register unrestricted firearms like the Steyr-Mannlicher HS .50 sniper rifle. There are also no provisions in Bill C-391 to reinstate the requirement that businesses keep records of firearm sales, a requirement in place since 1977 that was removed when the Firearms Act passed in 1995 as the information would be in the registry. This information, which is a crucial component of Canada’s gun control strategies, would be lost with Bill C-391 and no efforts would be made to rebuild such information in a way that helps police officers (as the current registry does).

Austrian Weapons in Iraq: A Smoking Gun from the Alps
By Marion Kraske in Vienna
From Spiegel Online
Published on Sunday, February 14, 2007

Steyr HS .50

Steyr HS .50

More than 800 high-powered weapons were shipped to Iran from Austria in 2004 over US and British objections. Now, the rifles may have turned up in the hands of Iraq insurgents.

It is considered one of the world’s most modern and precise weapons — the Steyr HS .50, made by Austrian weapons manufacturer Steyr-Mannlicher. The easily disassembled gun goes for about €4,000 in the Internet. And the buyer gets a deadly weapon that can penetrate basic armor at a range of 1.5 kilometers (just under a mile).

And they may now be in Iraq. According to a report in the Daily Telegraph on Tuesday, the US Army uncovered 100 of the weapons in a raid in Baghdad. Individual weapons, the paper writes, had already turned up in recent months, but now the number found has jumped to more than 100. Indeed, a Steyr HS .50 was reportedly used to shoot and kill a US officer in his vehicle.

“Obviously, if the reports are true, it would be profoundly disturbing,” said William Wanlund, a spokesman for the US Embassy in Vienna, according to the AP.

If the reports are true, it is highly likely that the hoard of HS .50 rifles US authorities found came from a shipment that left Austria in late 2004. Eight hundred of the rifles were shipped to Iran with the express approval of the government of then Chancellor Wolfgang Schüssel. Steyr-Mannlicher, the manufacturer of the weapons, had filed a request with the Austrian interior ministry for approval to export the weapons a year earlier.

Officially the Austrian company’s buyer was Iran’s federal police force, specifically a special anti-drug unit. The Iranians claimed at the time that they needed the weapons for use in fighting the drug trade — smugglers and dealers.

Concerned that these dangerous weapons could fall into the hands of insurgents and terrorists, the governments in London and Washington both tried to put a stop to the controversial sale, but were unsuccessful. Steyr-Mannlicher went through with the deal anyway.

The reaction came swiftly. In late 2005 the US government angrily imposed an embargo on the Austrian weapons manufacturer. Since then Steyr-Mannlicher, together with manufacturers from India and China, has been excluded from lucrative US government contracts.

The company remained stubborn. Wolfgang Fürlinger, the CEO of Steyr-Mannlicher at the time, made a public effort to downplay the dangers of the weapon, claiming that the HS .50 was less harmful than a pistol. He also insisted that the Iranian government had signed a so-called end-user certificate that ruled out the re-export of the guns.

Certificate or not, the Iranian weapons deal also triggered a heated political debate in Austria. The opposition party believed that the deal between Steyr and Tehran was everything but clean. Peter Pilz, a Green Party member of the Austrian parliament and his party’s spokesman on security issues, even went so far as to call the deal “illegal.”

Pilz argued that HS .50 was not a “toy weapon,” as many had claimed, but that the rifle was in fact capable of piercing armor-plated vehicles and body armor from great distances. The HS .50, according to Pilz, hardly seemed designed for use in fighting the drug trade.

The recent discovery of the Austrian weapons in Iraq has only served to confirm Pilz’s initial criticism. Pilz assigns the blame for the politically sensitive deal to the cabinet of former Chancellor Wolfgang Schüssel, and most of all to Günther Platter, the then interior minister and current defense minister, former Interior Minister Ernst Strasser and Ursula Plassnik, Austria’s former and current foreign minister.

Steyr-Mannlicher continues to fend off criticism of the deal. According to Franz Holzschuh, the company’s new owner, the serial numbers of the weapons that were found in Iraq would have to be checked clarify the source of the rifles. The weapons found in Iraq, says Holzschuh, could also be imitations. After all, he adds, the patents for the HS .50 expired “years ago.”

http://www.spiegel.de/international/0,1518,466284,00.html

Austrian Weapons in Iraq: A Smoking Gun from the Alps
By Marion Kraske in Vienna

From Spiegel Online

Published on Sunday, February 14, 2007

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Just another unrestricted firearm

Posted by cgccanada on May 4, 2010

The L115A3 sniper rifle mentioned in the article below, which can shoot more than 2 km away, is classified as a non-restricted firearm in Canada.  The rifle, as issued by the British army, is equipped with a sound suppressor which is a prohibited device in Canada. If the sound suppressors is removed, the L115A3 sniper rifle is classified as a non-restricted firearm. More details on this firearm is available on the British army web site:  http://www.army.mod.uk/equipment/support-weapons/1459.aspx

The Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security will begin to hear witnesses on Bill C-391 today. This bill proposes to repeal the requirement to register unrestricted firearms like the L115A3 sniper rifle. There are also no provisions in Bill C-391 to reinstate the requirement that businesses keep records of sales, a requirement since 1977 that was removed when the Firearms Act passed in 1995 as the information would be in the registry.

British sniper shoots down Canada’s bragging rights
Colin Freeze
From Tuesday’s Globe and Mail
Published on Tuesday, May. 04, 2010 12:07AM EDT
Last updated on Tuesday, May. 04, 2010 1:54AM EDT

Military observers are marvelling at a British sniper, revealed this week to have killed two Taliban fighters from a mountain perch 2.47 kilometres away. The story of these shots is being heard around the world as a feat of marksmanship without parallel in history.
Sadly, the news also puts an end to some national bragging rights: Until now, the Canadian Forces had claimed the world’s best sniper shot.

In 2002, when the Afghanistan war was still in its infancy, Canadian army Corporal Rob Furlong killed an alleged al-Qaeda fighter from 2.43 kilometres away – seemingly an unsurpassable feat.

That shot was never formally publicized – snipers are covert by nature, after all – but word leaked out over the years. The legend grew to the point where military observers hailed it as a landmark Canadian achievement.

“There was a certain frisson of pride involved there,” said historian Jack Granatstein. “I don’t think it’s significant in Canadian military history except insofar that it demonstrates that we are good snipers, after 25 years of assuming that we didn’t fight anybody.”
Contemplating both shots, he couldn’t help but marvel. “It’s amazing,” Mr. Granatstein said. “It’s absolutely amazing that you could fire a shot a someone [that far] away and hit them. … And the Brit hit two!”

Last November in Helmand province, British Corporal Craig Harrison killed the two insurgents from an astounding distance of 8,120 feet. News of the new record is only now being made public.

“The first round hit a machine-gunner in the stomach and killed him outright,” the British soldier told The Sunday Times of London. “The second insurgent grabbed the weapon and turned as my second shot hit him in the side. He went down, too.”

Former Canadian Forces sniper Rob Furlong killed an alleged al-Qaeda fighter in Afghanistan from 2.43 kilometres away in 2002, a legendary feat – but one now taking a back seat to British Corporal Craig Harrison’s two kills of Taliban fighters from a distance of 2.47 kilometres.

In war zones, soldiers are given high-powered scopes and other rifle technologies that get better all the time. “The reason they are able to make these kind of shots is they have high-quality lasers that tell them where their target is within one metre,” said retired U.S. major John Plaster, a Vietnam War veteran who now runs a U.S. sniper school.

Good students there, Mr. Plaster said, can hit a dime at 100 yards.

Luck, as ever, remains a factor. Snipers live for the those moments when their rules of engagement and a windless day combine to create the conditions for the perfect kill – even if a target is a mile or more away.

Marksmanship, of course, has impressed nations ever since ancient Greeks boasted that clear-eyed Odysseus could kill many enemies with a single arrow. The Swiss had William Tell shoot an apple off his son’s head with a crossbow. Medieval Brits marvelled at Robin Hood.

And Canada had Francis (Peggy) Pegahmagabow, an Ojibwa Indian from Ontario who was the highest-scoring Canadian sniper of the First World War, with accounts of his kills running as high as 378.

As for Corp. Furlong, his shot, though surpassed, will create chatter for years to come, Mr. Plaster said. He said he even bumped into the shy Canadian – now an Edmonton police officer – at a U.S. gun show last winter.

“I applauded him. Shook his hand,” Mr. Plaster said. “You can take great pride in him.”

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/british-sniper-shoots-down-canadas-bragging-rights/article1555772/?cmpid=rss1

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Doctors say scrapping long-gun registry a health risk

Posted by cgccanada on April 30, 2010

OTTAWA – A group of emergency doctors, nurses and suicide prevention workers asked members of Parliament to vote against a federal bill that seeks to quash the long-gun registry. The group says a significant drop in gun-related suicide since 1995 is evidence the registry works and scrapping it would set them back years in suicide prevention. “Suicide, contrary to public opinion, is often an impulsive gesture,” Dr. Alan Drummond of the Canadian Association for Emergency Physicians said Wednesday. “Keeping guns away from depressed people is essential.” Drummond has never seen a handgun injury in his 27 years as an emergency physician in rural Ontario, but he’s seen more than a few injuries and deaths inflicted by rifles and shot guns – most of them suicides. “As a coroner I go to lots of gun-related suicides. I’m telling you it’s difficult, it’s gut-wrenching.” The majority of firearm deaths in Canada are suicides and the guns most often used are rifles and shotguns, the group wrote in an open letter to MPs Wednesday.
That’s why the 61 organizations and medical professionals who signed the letter see gun registration as a public health issue rather than a crime control issue. (…)  A Canadian Press/Harris Decima poll released in November found 46 per cent of Canadians believe abolishing the long gun registry is a good idea, while 41 per cent think it’s a bad idea. The registry has been criticized for being inefficient, ineffective in reducing crime and massively overrun in cost. Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff, who supports a reduction or elimination in penalties for long-gun owners but wants to keep the registry, has said he will force his MPs to vote against the bill when it comes up for its third and final reading. “The Liberal leader is not fooling anyone with his proposals for unconstitutional amendments to Bill C-391,” Minister of Public Safety Vic Toews said in the House of Commons Wednesday. “It is time to end the criminalization of our hunters and outdoor enthusiasts once and for all.” There may be more guns and stronger opposition to the registry in rural areas. But health experts point out that there are also higher rates of gun deaths in rural communities and western provinces. “Firearm related injury is not an urban crime problem in downtown Toronto. These things happen in idyllic little communities like Perth,” said Drummond, who is a physician at the Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital. Since the gun registry was implemented there has been a 23 per reduction in gun-related suicide and a 36 per cent reduction in the use of firearms in intimate partner violence, Drummond said. He said people who are suicidal are often brought to the hospital by police who can alert doctors if the person has a gun in his or her home. “Knowing that a patient owns a gun is extremely important and valuable information for us as we determine the future risk of suicide.” “We commonly ask the police to remove guns from the home of those identified at risk.” Gun-related suicide attempts are far more lethal than other methods. Gun users stand a 96 per cent chance of dying, while the lethality rate of drug overdose is six per cent. Drummond said he is a gun owner himself and is not against gun ownership but he is an advocate for responsible use. “Suicide usually affects young people with big lives ahead of them,” he said. “And we know that with effective treatment for depression and mental illness that they can go on to lead productive lives.” “Every potential suicide victim counts.”
Full article at: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/breakingnews/doctors-nurses-tell-mps-scrapping-long-gun-registry-a-health-risk-92340189.html

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Repealing long-gun registry could get officers killed: Chief

Posted by cgccanada on April 30, 2010

By Laura Stone, Canwest News ServiceApril 28, 2010 8:02 PM

OTTAWA – The head of Canada’s association of police chiefs says
repealing the long-gun registry would harm police officers’ work and
“could get them killed.”

William Blair, chief of police in Toronto and president of the
Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, made the strongly worded
comments this week as the fight over a private member’s bill that
would scrap the registry raged on inside and outside of Parliament.

Conservative MP Candice Hoeppner’s Bill C-391 bill takes aim at what
the her party has long called a costly and ineffective registry, but
police chiefs, including Blair, have repeatedly defended the program.

“Police officers rely on information,” Blair said in comments posted
on the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police website.

“Accurate and complete information is the best protection I can give
them. Knowing (not assuming) who has firearms is valuable,” he said.

“The registry gives officers information that keeps them safe. If the
registry is taken from us, police officers may guess, but they cannot
know. It could get them killed. We are going to fight to make sure the
information they need to be safe is available to them.”

The difference between licensing and registration, according to the
RCMP, is that a firearms licence shows the licence holder has met
certain public-safety criteria and is allowed to possess and use
firearms. A registration certificate identifies a firearm and links
the firearm to its owner.

Ontario’s chiefs of police have also expressed their dismay
surrounding the bill, calling the registration “a vital public-safety
tool.”

“A licence tells us a person can have a gun. The registry tells us
what guns that person has. There is a huge difference – a difference
that could put the lives of citizens and our officers in great
danger,” said Chief Robert Herman of Thunder Bay, Ont., who is also
the vice-president of the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police.

The association said Canadian law-enforcement organizations use the
federal firearms registry 11,500 times a day on average, and more than
4.1 million times a year.

At least one police chief, however, recently announced his opposition
to the registry.

Rick Hanson, Calgary’s police chief, told CTV on Monday that “the gun
registry has done little to make the streets safer.”

He said officers use the registry as an investigative tool, and it
doesn’t work when dealing with gangs and drug dealers.

“It’s not helping. The guns these people have, they don’t register,
they don’t care, they’re probably stolen, they’re probably obtained
illegally, in many cases they’re prohibited,” Hanson told CTV.

Blair chalked up such comments to “a police chief or two who may not
be well informed about the real value of the registry. They are very
rare exceptions.”

Health-care experts also said Wednesday the controversial registry is
essential to Canadians as a “public health-and-safety” law – one that
can help prevent domestic murders, accidents and, most significantly,
suicides.

Most firearm deaths in Canada are suicides and the guns most often
used are rifles and shotguns, said a coalition of experts. They said
that in the nine years between 1995 and 2005 – the first year that the
long-gun registration was introduced as part of a wider gun-control
plan by a then-Liberal government – firearm suicides involving 15 to
35 year olds in the home decreased by 64 per cent.

Hoeppner responded by saying these doctors, while meaning well, are
“really confusing the issue.”

“I think we definitely have a problem with suicide in Canada, but the
long-gun registry does nothing to stop, to curb, to do anything to
actually address suicide. Licensing might help so that those people
don’t get guns, unfortunately if someone is going to commit suicide,
many times they’re still finding other ways,” said Hoeppner.

The bill passed in a preliminary vote in the Commons last November
with support of the eight Liberals and 12 New Democrats, and is
expected to return to the House of Commons late this spring or next
fall for another vote. Five Liberals have reversed their positions
since Liberal Leader Michael Ignatieff said his party would modify the
registry.

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Doctors group wants gun registry to stay

Posted by cgccanada on April 28, 2010

By CHRISTINA SPENCER, PARLIAMENTARY BUREAU
Last Updated: April 28, 2010 11:28am
Toronto Sun

OTTAWA — Repealing Canada’s long-gun registry would set back the significant gains in suicide prevention since the registry was introduced, emergency doctors and public health organizations said Wednesday.

In an open letter to MPs, 28 medical and health organizations said most firearms deaths in Canada are suicides, and the guns most frequently used are rifles and shotguns. They argued gun-related deaths and suicides in particular have diminished since the advent of the long-gun registry in 1995.

“The vast majority of firearm deaths in Canada are not gang-related but occur when an ordinary citizen becomes suicidal or violent, often under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or during a personal crisis such as marital breakdown or job loss,” their letter says.

“While it is true that there are more guns in rural areas, and therefore more opposition to gun control, it is equally true that there are higher rates of gun deaths in rural communities and western provinces.”

A private member’s bill to scrap the registry, put forward by Tory Candice Hoeppner, is before the House of Commons.

Dr. Alan Drummond of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians said, “Suicide is not a premeditated act usually; it’s usually impulsive, somebody feels overwhelmed, the gun is available, they pull the trigger.”

For that reason, emergency doctors want the registry to remain intact.

He said it is particularly helpful when police or a family member bring someone to an emergency department who is depressed or suicidal. Knowing if there is a gun in the home can make a huge difference, as physicians can then recommend police temporarily remove the firearm.

Drummond, a rural doctor who owns registered guns himself, said, “This, for us, is not really an issue of crime control but rather an issue of public health and safety.”

http://www.torontosun.com/news/canada/2010/04/28/13747341-qmi.html

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April 25, 2010, Open Letter To Jack Layton

Posted by cgccanada on April 27, 2010

Reposted from mrsinistergreg.blogspot.com

Dear Jack, Long time, no speak. There is a rumour going around that you are thinking of whipping the vote on the long gun registry. Is this true? Don’t get an old guy’s hopes up, if you are just teasing. I hope you are serious and are ready to stand up for what you know is right.  I know this isn’t easy, what with the Conservatives playing American style pressure ads in rural ridings, but this alone should be enough for you to crack the whip. The idea that this is somehow a free vote is just absurd. The Conservative Party is playing games, as it always does, with the truth. The truth is, this is a government bill in all but name. It has the support of the government and the governing party is spending vast amounts of advertising dollars, bullying opposition members. My rule of thumb is, if the governing party has to spend millions on advertising, to pressure opposition votes, it is not a free vote. Call bullshit on this free vote and make your members stand and say no.  Finally, the NDP stands for gun control. Like it or not, this gun registry is part of the regime of gun control in this country and the police seem to agree it is necessary… read more

Posted in Current Events, Gun Registry, Uncategorized | Tagged: , | Comments Off on April 25, 2010, Open Letter To Jack Layton

Politicians are forgetting rural women – Outcry and national poll suggests Canadians and women in particular support gun registry –

Posted by cgccanada on April 26, 2010

TORONTO, April 26, 2010 –

Citing letters from rural women’s groups across the country and just released polling results, the Coalition for Gun Control is calling on federal politicians to remember that the vocal opponents to gun control do not speak for Canadians, for rural women nor even for all gun owners.

“We hear repeatedly that gun control is an urban issue that “punishes” rural gun owners,” said Wendy Cukier, Coalition for Gun Control president. “The terrible irony is that where there are more guns, there are also higher rates of gun death and injury. Most police officers killed with guns are murdered with rifles and shotguns but suicides with firearms and domestic violence in rural communities seldom make the front page. Rural women’s groups, psychiatrists and health care professionals along with police have all documented these problems and why the registry is important to help keep guns from people who are a danger to themselves or others. Rifles and shotguns are the guns most often used in violence against women because those are the firearms most readily available.”

Citing a just released Leger and Leger poll, Cukier added:  “Twice as many Canadians (59 per cent) say the registration of rifles and shotguns should be maintained compared to those who say it should be scrapped (27 per cent).  In every province but Manitoba and Saskatchewan more people support the registry than oppose it. The poll also shows that women support the gun registry (66 per cent) compared to men (51 per cent). More people living with gun owners (47 per cent) support the registry than oppose it (36 per cent) and a substantial proportion of gun owners (36 per cent) actually support the registry (versus 59 per cent opposed). The opponents may be louder and better financed, but among households with guns in Canada, votes are almost evenly split. Many politicians from rural areas seem to forget that women vote too.”

Poll Highlights
1.       Overall, supporters of the registry outnumber opponents by 2:1
– 59 per cent said registration is useful and should be maintained compared to 27 per cent who thought it was useless and should be scrapped and 14 per cent who said undecided or preferred not to say.

2.        In every province across Canada, except Manitoba/Saskatchewan more people support the registry than oppose it.
Quebec 74 per cent to 12 per cent, Ontario 58 per cent versus 27 per cent, MB/SK 39 per cent versus 45 per cent, ALB 48 per cent versus 37 per cent, BC 57 per cent versus 31per cent

3.       Women are more likely to support the registry (66 per cent) than men (51 per cent)

4.       Parents also support the registration of firearms with 61 per cent for and 26 per cent against.

The omnibus poll conducted by Leger and Leger for the Coalition for Gun Control had 1506
respondents (margin of error ± 2,53%, 19 times out of 20) n December 21 to 23, 2009 and asked:
Recently, new legislation was introduced to eliminate the need to register rifles and shotguns.  While licenses to own are renewed periodically, registration is a one time only procedure that occurs when a gun is purchased. A lot of money was spent setting up the system, but the current cost of registering rifles and shotguns is three million dollars a year. Some people say that registration ensures gun owners are accountable for their firearms and that the registry is an important tool used daily by police to prevent and investigate crime. Others say that registering guns unduly burdens gun owners, is of no use and should be eliminated.  Which represents your position?
Response:
The concept of registering guns is useful and should be maintained; or
The concept of registering guns is useless and should be eliminated

For more information, please visit http://www.guncontrol.ca

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Another clear example that C-391 is Private Members Bill (PMB) in name only. It is a government bill disguised as a PMB.

Posted by cgccanada on April 22, 2010

Globe and mail, Thursday, April 22, 2010 8:25 AM, Jane Taber (Blog) “Tory bagmen come out with long guns blazing”

Stephen Harper’s Conservatives have launched a new fundraising campaign aimed at filling their war chest on the back of Michael Ignatieff’s vow to whip his caucus into voting to preserve the long-gun registry.
A fundraising letter from Irving Gerstein, the chair of Conservative Fund Canada, pleading for donations of between $100 and $200, was sent late yesterday. It follows the party’s radio ad campaign targeting the ridings of the eight Liberal MPs who voted with the government to scrap the controversial program.
Mr. Gerstein, who was appointed to the Senate by the Prime Minister last year, names the eight Grit rebels in his letter, urging supporters to donate now to help “hold these Liberal MPs to their previous commitment.”
“They need to understand the political consequences of going back on their word. Of voting against their constituents. Of choosing Michael Ignatieff over their friends and neighbours back home.”
Mr. Ignatieff, the Liberal Leader, reignited the debate over scrapping the long-gun registry this week in a speech to police. He said his caucus would not support a Conservative private member’s bill to abolish the registry.
The bill, by Manitoba MP Candice Hoeppner, is expected to return to the House for third reading in either May or June. Last November, eight of Mr. Ignatieff’s MPs, mainly from rural ridings, voted for the Tory legislation despite the fact the long-gun registry was created by the Jean Chrétien’s Liberals – at great political cost.
“These MPs have now been told that they MUST support Michael Ignatieff,” Mr. Gerstein writes. “They must vote to protect and preserve the failed long-gun registry. They must choose their leader over their constituents. They must do what they have been told.”
The Harper Tories are successful at raising money, knowing which buttons to push (anti-CBC fundraising works well, apparently) to bring in cash to help pay for their anti-Liberal ad campaigns and other pre-writ strategy spending.
But the Conservative zeal to scrap the registry has also created headaches and embarrassment for the Prime Minister. An aggressively-worded press release, saying police chiefs are part of a cult for supporting the registry and suggesting Liberal MPs should beat their leader “black and blue” for his registry support, was sent out this week from the office of anti-long gun registry MP Garry Breitkreuz.
The Saskatchewan MP apologized, saying he didn’t write the letter. And yesterday, in Question Period, Mr. Harper said the staffer who wrote the release had resigned.
Mr. Gerstein, meanwhile, says donations will “ensure that every long-gun owner, every citizen and every voter in these eight Liberal ridings will be fully aware of the choice they must make.”
“Working together we can scrap the failed Liberal long-gun registry,” he writes. “If Michael Ignatieff succeeds, the failed long-gun registry will continue to threaten law-abiding farmers, hunters and sport-shooting competitors – while doing nothing to reduce gun crime in our major cities.”
The full text of the Conservative fundraising letter follows:
(Urgent) Stop Michael Ignatieff from preserving the failed long-gun registry
Wednesday, April 21, 2010
Earlier this week, Michael Ignatieff turned his back on rural Canadians by renewing his vow to protect and preserve the failed long-gun registry. And this time around, he’s promised to whip his rural MPs into protecting and preserving this costly Liberal legacy.
If Michael Ignatieff succeeds, the failed long-gun registry will continue to threaten law-abiding farmers, hunters and sport-shooting competitors – while doing nothing to reduce gun crime in our major cities.
We need your support now to prevent that from happening. Please make a contribution of $200 or $100 by following this link right now.
During the last session of Parliament, eight Liberal MPs stood with their constituents and voted with the Conservative Government to scrap the long-gun registry.
Liberal MP Todd Russell was clear:
“I’ve been clear about my position and I will be consistent with that particular position, and I will vote subsequently to scrap the long-gun registry,” (The Labradorian, Dec. 29, 2009).
So was Liberal MP Anthony Rota. He went so far as to call the long-gun registry “disgusting” (North Bay Nugget, June 18, 2004).
Russell and Rota were joined by six other Liberal MPs in voting against the long-gun registry: Scott Andrews, Larry Bagnell, Jean-Claude D’Amours, Wayne Easter, Keith Martin and Scott Simms.
These MPs have now been told that they MUST support Michael Ignatieff. They must vote to protect and preserve the failed long-gun registry. They must choose their leader over their constituents. They must do what they have been told.
We need your help today to hold these Liberal MPs to their previous commitment. They need to understand the political consequences of going back on their word. Of voting against their constituents. Of choosing Michael Ignatieff over their friends and neighbours back home.
The Conservative Party is launching a campaign to do just that. Please make a contribution of $200 or $100 right now by following this link in support of this campaign. We will ensure that every long-gun owner, every citizen and every voter in these eight Liberal ridings will be fully aware of the choice they must make.
Their choice will be clear: SCRAP the failed long-gun registry or KEEP it. It’s as simple as that. No shifting, no sliding.
We need your help today to keep these Liberal MPs to their word. Make a contribution of $200 or $100 right now by following this link.
Working together we can scrap the failed Liberal long-gun registry. Support our campaign today.
Sincerely,
Irving R. Gerstein, C.M., O.Ont.
Chair, Conservative Fund Canada
PS – Remember that you’ll receive a tax receipt for any contribution you make. This can make the actual cost of your contribution as low as 25% of your overall giving this year. Please, follow this link right now and make a contribution of $200 or $100.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ottawa-notebook/tory-bagmen-come-out-with-long-guns-blazing/article1542951/

Posted in Canadian gun control, Gun Registry, news | Tagged: , | Comments Off on Another clear example that C-391 is Private Members Bill (PMB) in name only. It is a government bill disguised as a PMB.

Urgent: C-391, A Private Members Bill in name only

Posted by cgccanada on April 21, 2010

Since the beginning of the discussions of Private Members Bill C-391, the Coalition has maintained that it is a Private Members Bill (PMB) in name only, citing ample evidence that in fact it is a government bill dressed up as a private members bill. This has been an important issue with opposition leaders claiming they cannot “whip” the vote in their caucuses because it is a PMB. We noted that the Prime Minister has been promoting it, that the Conservative Party of Canada has been supporting it with aggressive campaigns and, more recently, that it was referenced in the speech from the Throne. Yesterday we received proof positive: Public Safety minister Vic Toews answered a question about the legislation from a Conservative backbencher.  As a PMB and not a government bill, the question should have been ruled out of order by the speaker and the Minister had no business answering a question about it. Minister Toews spoke glowingly about the importance of this bill.

“ Mr. Speaker, the Liberal leader has again chosen to turn his back on rural Canadians by clearly stating he still supports a wasteful and ineffective long gun registry. Our government believes that gun control should target criminals, not law-abiding citizens. It should promote safe streets, not penalize the lawful activities of hunters and rural Canadians. The Liberal leader is bending over backward to secure guilty pleas from law-abiding farmers and duck hunters. The choice is clear for all MPs, especially those who voted for the bill at second reading. We either vote to scrap the bill, or we keep it.” http://www2.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=40&Ses=3&DocId=4446673

Throughout this process, BQ leader Gilles Duceppe has whipped his party’s vote. Indeed on November 4, 2009 one Bloc MP recovering from open heart surgery and another with a suspected case of swine flu, in a surgical mask, showed up to vote against the Conservatives. On Monday, April 19, 2010 Liberal Leader Michael Ignatieff announced he would whip the Liberal vote to defeat Bill C-391. To date NDP leader Jack Layton has continued to insist that his hands are tied because it is a PMB. Please make sure he understands that this is not the case.

Another example of this bill being clearly a government bill is that the Conservative Party has released another series of radio advertisings targeting eight rural Liberal MPs. A Conservative official reported “These MPs voted to end the long-gun registry in the past, they’ve been continuously promising their constituents that they would vote to end it, but now Ignatieff is forcing them to vote to keep the registry.” “The ads encourage people to call their MPs and tell them they should vote for what their constituents want — to end the long-gun registry — not what their Liberal boss wants, which is to keep the registry.” (Canoe News, April 21, 2010 Kathleen Harris “Ads target rogue Grits over gun registry” http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Politics/2010/04/21/13660536-qmi.html)

Please call Jack Layton and the NDP MPs today and tell them loud and clear that Canadians want the gun registry, Bill C-391 is a government bill and should not get the NDP’s support. Phone numbers are below.

The COALITION for Gun Control
http://www.guncontrol.ca
Twitter: CGCguncontrol • Blog: https://guncontrolcanada.wordpress.com/
E-mail us at: cgc.montreal@gmail.com

NDP MPs – Note the first telephone number listed is on Parliament Hill, the second in the riding

The Honourable Jack Layton, Party leader (Toronto — Danforth, ON) (613) 995-7224, (416) 405-8914
Mr. Joe Comartin in charge of the gun control file (Windsor — Tecumseh, ON) (613) 947-3445 ,(519) 988-1826
Mr. Don Davies, Critic Public Safety, Co-Chair of SECU committee (Vancouver Kingsway, BC) (613) 943-0267, (604) 775-6263
Ms. Irene Mathyssen, Critic Status of Women, Deputy Critic Public Safety (London — Fanshawe, ON) (613) 995-2901, (519) 685-4745

NDP MPs that voted with the Conservatives in favour of C-391 last November
Mr. Malcolm Allen (Welland, ON) (613) 995-0988
Mr. Charlie Angus (Timmins — James Bay, ON) (613) 992-2919, (705) 567-2747
Ms. Niki Ashton (Churchill, MB) (613) 992-3018, (866) 785-0522
Mr. Dennis Bevington (Western Arctic, NT) (613) 992-4587, (867) 873-6995
Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena — Bulkley Valley, BC) (613) 993-6654, (250) 877-4140
Mr. Claude Gravelle (Nickel Belt, ON) (613) 995-9107, (705) 897-2222
Ms. Carol Hughes (Algoma — Manitoulin — Kapuskasing, ON) (613) 996-5376, (705) 848- 8080
Mr. Bruce Hyer (Thunder Bay — Superior-North, ON) (613) 996-4792, (807) 345-1818
Mr. Jim Maloway (Elmwood — Transcona, MB) (613) 995-6339, (204) 984-2499
Mr. John Rafferty (Thunder Bay — Rainy River, ON) (613) 992-3061, (807) 623-6000
Mr. Peter Stoffer (Sackville — Eastern Shore, NS) (613) 995-5822, (902) 861-2311
Mr. Glenn Thibeault (Sudbury, ON) (613) 996-8962, (705) 673-7107

Other NDP MPs
Mr. Alex Atamanenko (British Columbia — Southern Interior, BC) (613) 996-8036, (250) 365-2792
Ms. Chris Charlton (Hamilton Mountain, ON) (613) 995-9389, (905) 574-3331
Ms. Olivia Chow (Trinity — Spadina, ON) (613) 992-2352, (416) 533-2710
Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, ON) (613) 995-1757, (905) 526-0770
Ms. Jean Crowder (Nanaimo — Cowichan, BC) (613) 943-2180, (250) 746-4896
Ms. Libby Davies (Vancouver East, BC) (613) 992-6030, (604) 775-5800
Mr. Paul Dewar (Ottawa Centre, ON) (613) 996-5322, (613) 946-8682
Mr. Fin Donnelly (New Westminster – Coquitlam, BC) (613) 947-4455, (604) 664-9229
Ms. Linda Duncan (Edmonton–Strathcona, AB) (613) 995-7325, (780) 495-8404
Mr. Yvon Godin (Acadie — Bathurst, NB) (613) 992-2165, (506) 548-7511
Mr. Jack Harris (St-John’s East, NF) (613) 996-7269, (709) 772-7171
Mr. Peter Julian (Burnaby — New Westminster, BC) (613) 992-4214, (604) 775-5707
Ms. Megan Leslie (Halifax, NS) (613) 995-7614, (902) 426-8691
Mr. Wayne Marston (Hamilton-East — Stoney Creek, ON) (613) 992-6535, (905) 662-4763
Mr. Pat Martin (Winnipeg-Centre, MB) (613) 992-5308, (204) 984-1675
Mr. Tony Martin (Sault-Ste. Marie, ON) (613) 992-9723, (705) 941-2900
Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, ON) (613) 996-1541, (519) 255-1631
Mr. Thomas J. Mulcair (Outremont, QC) (613) 995-7691, (514) 736-2727
Ms. Denise Savoie (Victoria, BC) (613) 996-2358, (250) 363-3600
Mr. Bill Siksay (Burnaby — Douglas, BC) (613) 996-5597, (604) 291-8863
Ms. Judy Wasylycia-Leis (Winnipeg North, MB) (613) 996-6417, (204) 984-1767

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WINDSOR STAR – MARCH 29, 2010, LETTER: Gun registry saves lives BY PRISCILLA DE VILLIERS

Posted by cgccanada on March 30, 2010

TO RESPOND: letters@thestar.canwest.com

Re: Long-gun registry, March 19. Contrary to Candice Hoeppner’s comments, the inquest into the suicide of my daughter’s killer concluded that the licensing of gun owners and registration of rifles and shotguns might have saved both her life and that of Karen Marquis of New Brunswick. Six other inquests, each examining different circumstances, also recommended the need for comprehensive controls on all firearms that screen gun owners for risk factors of violence and suicides and register firearms to their legitimate owner, holding it accountable and avoiding diversion to the illegal market. By playing to the gun lobby, the Conservatives are disregarding public safety. In its unanimous decision in 2000, the Supreme Court stated that registration cannot be severed from licensing and, together, these measures “both tightly linked to Parliament’s goal of promoting safety by reducing the misuse of any and all firearms.” Every public safety group, medical association and individual who cares about the safety and security of others also stand firmly behind the law. As a mother who has lost a beloved daughter to a suicidal predator, I know grief, but I also know that although it is too late to save Nina, we must learn from the preventable deaths of so many innocent victims and do everything possible to save others. Lives have been saved by the registry. Eliminating it will put lives in danger. PRISCILLA de VILLIERS, Burlington http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Priscilla_de_Villiers http://www.caveat.org/

Posted in Current Events, Gun Registry | Tagged: , , | Comments Off on WINDSOR STAR – MARCH 29, 2010, LETTER: Gun registry saves lives BY PRISCILLA DE VILLIERS