The Coalition for Gun Control/Pour le Controle des Armes

Archive for August, 2009

From The Montreal Gazette, August 28, 2009, Suspect in custody after gun threat at Collège Ahuntsic

Posted by cgccanada on August 31, 2009

MONTREAL – Collège Ahuntsic was evacuated Friday afternoon after someone inside the school received a threatening letter that mentioned a gun. Police received a call from the college’s security department at 3:45 p.m. and responded by evacuating students and blocking off the school’s entrance with yellow police tape. The evacuation was suspended, however, when police learned the 21-year-old suspect was not inside the college. Police used a description of the suspect’s car to track him down and make an arrest at the intersection of Dorval Ave. and Carson Ave. in the borough of Dorval-L’île-Dorval. He will remain in police custody this evening for questioning. Police said no one was hurt in the incident.

Advertisements

Posted in Current Events | Tagged: , | Comments Off on From The Montreal Gazette, August 28, 2009, Suspect in custody after gun threat at Collège Ahuntsic

From Montreal Gazette, August 24, 2009, Police arrest 18 with Project Ondée

Posted by cgccanada on August 25, 2009

Montreal police have arrested 18 people in connection with a string of violent incidents in Montreal’s western region. As part of a major investigation dubbed Project Ondée, police say they took 13 men and 5 women into custody over the course of several weeks beginning in late July. Officers also executed search warrants on seven homes and three vehicles. Among the objects seized were three submachine guns, a sawed-off shotgun, a rifle, four handguns, one machete, 440 bullets of various calibres, three bullet-proof vests, a quantity of illegal drugs, and cash amounting to $100,000 CAD. The investigation was launched after several violent crimes occurred in Pierrefonds and Dollard-des-Ormeaux earlier this summer. “Battling street gang activity is a priority for the Montreal police department,” said Peter Lambrinakos, chief of criminal investigations for the western region in Montreal. “We take these kinds of crimes very seriously.” Eleven of the suspects will remain in custody until their scheduled court appearances. They face a bevy of charges including weapons trafficking, possession of unauthorized firearms, possession of stolen weapons, and drug possession with intent to traffic.

Posted in Current Events | Tagged: | Comments Off on From Montreal Gazette, August 24, 2009, Police arrest 18 with Project Ondée

From: The Ottawa Citizen, August 16, 2009, A handgun’s deadly journey, Bought in Maine, smuggled across the border, recovered after a double homicide in Ottawa

Posted by cgccanada on August 21, 2009

On June 13, 2006, two men in an older-model four-door Mercury pulled up to Maine Military Supply in Brewer, Maine. Inside the store, one of the men, a Canadian named Andrew Porter, discreetly took a large wad of cash from his pocket and handed it to the other man, Lawrence Sears. Sears, a Maine resident, spoke to the clerk while Porter walked around the store. Sears then paid $1,427.92 in cash for eight Hi-Point pistols. He bought the handguns for Porter, who later told authorities that he had smuggled them across the border. Just over a year later, one of the guns was found by Ottawa police investigating a double homicide at a Montreal Road motel room. “There was a gun recovered and a serial number off that gun was traced back to one of these eight that was purchased in Brewer,” said Assistant U.S. Attorney Joel Casey, who worked on the illegal gun purchase cases involving Porter, who is from St. Stephen, New Brunswick, and a handful of Maine residents who bought firearms for him, including Sears. The judge was told that “we did not have any evidence that Mr. Sears or Mr. Porter knew that the gun was going to be used a year later in a homicide in Ottawa,” he said. Ottawa police won’t comment on details of the double homicide, since the man they arrested in connection with the deaths is scheduled to go to trial this fall. However, police Chief Vern White said the gun trace had uncovered a good example of the impact the activity is having on Ottawa. White, an advocate of tightening up the border and “heavier-hitting” legislation when it comes to people found guilty of transporting illegal firearms, said, “I think it’s indicative of what we see, guns coming across the border illegally that are having a direct impact on crime in this city.” Police found a bloody scene when they responded to a call about a man suffering from convulsions in the parking lot of Pari’s Motel at about 10 p.m. on June 21, 2007. Officers discovered the body of a 28-year-old man who had been shot once in the upper chest. After probing further, police discovered a second body, that of a 32-year-old man, tied to a bed in one of the hotel rooms. He had died from a gunshot wound to the head. A man was arrested in Markham in the days following the shooting. Back in the U.S., Andrew Porter and a handful of Maine residents pleaded guilty after facing several charges in connection with the illegal gun purchases, also known as “straw purchases.” A gun shop owner in Machais, Maine, contacted the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms in June 2006 to report that two men (later determined to be Sears and Porter) had tried to buy 10 guns on June 12, 2006. Porter had told the store owner that he had just moved to the area from Florida and didn’t have identification, so Sears would have to buy them for him, court documents show. Porter was arrested on Sept. 12, 2007, and told U.S. authorities that he would take handguns bought for him back to Canada, where they would be delivered to other people. Had the cases gone to trial, prosecutors expected Sears to testify that he bought 50 to 60 handguns for Porter, whom he saw hide the guns in his vehicle. Another Maine resident who worked as a gun salesman had said that Porter paid him $30 to $40 for each gun bought for him, according to documents.  Evidence entered in court shows that other Canadian police forces have seized guns that Porter brought into Canada. One handgun was recovered by Peel Regional police after an alleged street gang member flashed it to a nightclub employee during an argument, while a Saint John police officer found another pistol in the pocket of a 19-year-old man.  Last year, Porter pleaded guilty to six offences, including violation of the Arms Control Export Act, and was sentenced to 31 months in prison on each count, to be served concurrently.

Posted in Current Events, Gun Registry | Tagged: , , , | Comments Off on From: The Ottawa Citizen, August 16, 2009, A handgun’s deadly journey, Bought in Maine, smuggled across the border, recovered after a double homicide in Ottawa

From The Barrie Examiner, August 17, 2009, Police confiscate 29 guns

Posted by cgccanada on August 20, 2009

Posted By NICKI CRUICKSHANK

Barrie police cleaned a 44-year-old Barrie man’s gun collection out of his downtown home, yesterday afternoon.  Members of the criminal investigations and guns and gangs units seized nearly 30 firearms from 58 Caroline St. home around 1 p. m., after executing a search warrant.  “This size of a weapons seizure is not common,” said Sgt. Robert Allan. “This is absolutely the largest weapons seizure I’m aware of for Barrie police.”  Allan said the home search and man’s arrest was in connection to a previous break and enter on June 25.  “The break-in was at a different location, and a registered firearm was stolen from that residence,” Allan said. “The suspect in custody did have the stolen firearm in his possession.”  The man’s identity is being temporarily withheld until more charges are determined next week. A total of 29 firearms — shotguns, rifles and handguns — plus more than 1,000 rounds of ammunition were confiscated from the home.  The numerous weapons and bullets covered a display table at the Barrie police station on Bell Farm Road, last evening.  Twenty-one of the firearms were registered, but others weren’t.  Two sawed-off rifles and a semi-automatic pistol were found among the seized firearms, which police say are prohibited weapons, and all three were loaded.  “We aren’t sure which ones were registered yet, but if the prohibited ones were at one time, those won’t be valid now,” Allan said. “Our guys have days and days of investigation ahead of them to qualify each weapon, determine which were registered and why he had them all. Police are looking into whether the man was a registered member of a rifle range or gun club in the area.  “He had licenses for many of them, but as for a hunting license, we’re not sure yet,” said Det.-Const. John Parcells, an investigating officer on the case. “It’s hard to get possession of handguns unless you’re part of a gun club. But the suspect is the kind of guy clubs would want nothing to do with.”  In the end, Allan said he’s relieved about the seizure.  “It’s good that we’ve got these out of our community,” he said. “It’s a concern knowing these were all were out there.  “We had to exercise extreme caution going into that home,” Allan added. “He had these weapons stored all over the place, and none of them properly stored. That will reflect on his case in court.”  Allan said information on specific charges isn’t being released yet, either.  “It’s so early in the investigation that we aren’t able to comment on charges right now,” Allan said. “He’ll probably go to court with minimal charges, but more will be added as the case and investigation continues.”  Allan said the suspect’s firearms will only be returned to him if the courts allow for it.

Posted in Current Events, Gun Registry | Tagged: , , , | Comments Off on From The Barrie Examiner, August 17, 2009, Police confiscate 29 guns

From Ottawa Citizen, August 16, 2009, Ottawa criminals are increasingly using firearms, whether they’re smuggled from the U.S, stolen, or merely replicas. For police, it’s becoming a Gun Fight

Posted by cgccanada on August 19, 2009

BY NECO COCKBURN

OTTAWA – The handgun, wrapped in a black do-rag, was in a spot where you might expect to see an old essay or loose change: underneath clothes on the floor of a University of Ottawa dorm room. Acting on a tip that Moussa Osman had stashed a rusty silver Llama .45- calibre semi-automatic handgun, police raided the student residence this spring, seizing the weapon, which was loaded with two rounds of ammunition, and $2,710 in cash under the bed. Osman, 23, is alleged by police to have ties to the Crips street gang. He was not a student at the university, but his 18-year-old girlfriend was, and lived in the dorm. On July 31, Osman stood in a prisoner’s box at the Ottawa courthouse and pleaded guilty to possessing the gun, whose discovery in the dorm room Justice David Wake called “chilling.” The case was one of a growing number of handgun-related crimes and seizures over the past year that worry Ottawa police. The number of handguns seized by the force doubled during the first six months of this year, from 54 to 108. During that time, several high-profile gun incidents have shaken various parts of the city. – – Shootings, including the death of a 26-year-old man in May after he was shot inside a crowded ByWard Market club during a weekly hip-hop night. In April, a 65-year-old man was shot by a former employee at his Carp-area home. The suspect fled and was chased by police along Highway 417. When he left his vehicle along the busy highway, the man pulled out a handgun and was shot by police, but died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. – – Gun seizures, including Osman’s case and another incident in March in which a 15-year-old boy allegedly brought an unloaded .357 Magnum handgun to his high school and pointed it at another student. – – Armed robberies, in which teenagers and young adults have allegedly used real or fake handguns. Late last month, a young man showed what appeared to be a handgun and demanded narcotics at a Shoppers Drug Mart on Alta Vista Drive. He fled to a vehicle, according to police, who charged two 17-year-olds and recovered a pellet pistol. In March, shots rang out in a quiet neighbourhood when police fired guns at a suspected 27-year-old bank robber who they believed to be carrying a gun. Bullets hit at least two residential homes and a parked car. The suspect was killed and his gun determined to be a replica. An investigation by Ontario’s Special Investigations Unit determined that the officers were not criminally responsible for the death of the man, who “behaved in a manner that would cause a reasonable person to conclude that it was real.” Officers say they’re concerned about an apparent increase in the number of people carrying loaded handguns. They’re also troubled by the popularity of gangsta rap culture that views guns as a fashion accessory, as well as shootings carried out to uphold an image rather than for usual criminal reasons such as enforcement or robberies. Motives during some of the recent shootings in Ottawa involve “nothing more than someone feels that they’ve been dissed or disrespected in some kind of way and the way they choose to retaliate is by taking a gun and firing shots,” said Det. Chris O’Brien of the Ottawa police guns and gangs unit. “That’s happening more and more, and to us as police officers who investigate street gangs … it’s an alarming trend,” said O’Brien, who would not discuss specific cases that remain under investigation or before the courts. Meanwhile, police continue to recover handguns. Det.-Const. Craig Bridgeman of the OPP’s Provincial Weapons Enforcement Unit (PWEU) is wary of gun seizure statistics, saying they “can be massaged to say whatever it is you want to say” regarding the touchy issue of guns and gun laws, but officers say that they have also noticed anecdotal evidence of a rise in handgun use during the past 10 years. “One guy gets a gun, the other guy that’s got to protect himself gets a gun,” said acting Staff-Sgt. Steve Bell, the head of the guns and gangs unit. Unlike some weapons, a well-maintained handgun can be kept and moved by criminals for years. “They’re smaller, they’re concealable, they’re basically the ideal type of weapon for a person that seeks to have ease of movement, disguise and be able to carry out various criminal activities,” said O’Brien. They are tools of the trade, police say — instruments to help people get the money and respect that’s sought on the streets. Asmick Jean-Jacques, a former Montreal gangster who tried to expand his turf to Ottawa before he left the lifestyle and became a Christian pastor in 2007, said he knew back in the day that “a gun is power.” “Anybody, I don’t care what size he is, but if I point that thing on him, hey, I’ll get him to do jumping jacks if I want to.” Detectives are quick to point out that not all criminal gun users are gang members, although O’Brien says that more often than not, crime handguns seized in Ottawa come from gang members or people linked to gang activity – — the main purpose of which is drug trafficking. The guns and gangs unit, formed in September 2006, contains detectives who actively seek out guns through methods such as search warrants and the use of confidential informants. The unit’s work could be one reason for the increase in the number of gun seizures in the city, according to police, but veteran officers say they have also seen a rise in the number of people they see carrying loaded handguns. In April, police headed to a Bank Street clothing shop and tattoo parlour after receiving a tip that a gun was seen inside. Officers arrested a man leaving the store and seized a loaded .357 Magnum revolver from his vehicle. “We used to see information about Joe Criminal being in possession of a gun. … but when he was stopped often he didn’t have that firearm on him or it ended up being a replica or an air gun,” said Det.-Const. Chris Benson, a former guns and gangs unit member who has been with Ottawa police for 10 years. After air guns, officers started to find real guns with no ammunition, Benson said. “Now we’re seeing the firearms with ammunition actually being used and discharged.” Benson is currently seconded to the PWEU, a joint forces operation made up of several police forces, along with the Canada Border Services Agency, that is aimed at taking so-called “crime guns” — any firearm used or intended to be used in criminal activity, or any gun with an obliterated serial number — off the street. PWEU’s members, along with some of the detectives in the guns and gangs unit, also trace guns back to their origin using their serial numbers, makes and models. Bridgeman, a 20-year OPP veteran who has been with PWEU for seven years, said about half of the crime guns seized in Ontario are diverted from Canadian gun owners, largely through theft or exploitation, while the other half are smuggled from other countries, usually the U.S. “We don’t have shipping containers of guns from China arriving at the port of Montreal and being distributed to criminals, but what we do have is people who make a lot of money going to the U.S. and exploiting the lighter or lesser laws regarding firearms ownership in some states,” Bridgeman said. Sitting in the basement of the Ottawa police headquarters on Elgin Street, Bridgeman displayed an array of guns seized in Ontario, from an AK-47 recovered after a shooting in Ottawa to a small silver handgun he refers to as a “throwaway,” or “Saturday night special.” “That’s a gun that’s purchased for $80 at a flea market in Florida and driven here and sold in the streets for $1,500 with a box of ammunition. You can see the return on investment.” Despite the inflated price, people who use guns often see them as a necessary investment, police say. There are no major trends in the types of handguns used in Ottawa — whatever is available is usually the driving factor in what is bought — but cheaper knockoffs of guns that are referenced in pop culture can become popular, Bridgeman said. “If tomorrow, 50 Cent has that gun in his waistband when he promotes a video or a movie, we’ll see a trend in the rise for that gun,” said Bridgeman. Police say guns are easily available on the black market once connections are made. Benson said he dealt with a recent case in which an undercover officer was sent to buy a gun after receiving information about an alleged trafficker. “The commitment was done on basically the first meeting with an undercover police officer. That’s a stranger meeting a stranger, and they agreed to do a firearms transaction,” he said, refusing to give further details because the case is before the courts. Police say socio-economic factors play a role in today’s gun culture, and Bridgeman is concerned about the indoctrination of young people into a culture where guns are popular not just for criminality, but also for image. Handguns have reached the point where some people see them as fashion accessories, Bridgeman said. “We’ve taken guns off young children who didn’t know why they had the gun or why they wanted it, they just thought it’s gonna be cool to have a gun,” Bridgeman said. “I don’t wake up as a 12-year-old one day and say I’m gonna go get myself … crack and start slinging it on the street corner. That’s learned. It’s learned through many different means. “If other folks in my neighbourhood are involved in that and they held themselves out to be my role models, then maybe I’m gonna subscribe to that. And when I’m inundated with messages every day from my peers, from the folks I look up to as role models, from the media, it’s just a matter of time.” People already involved in that lifestyle provide a steady stream of work to officers trying to clear illegal guns from the streets. In January, police investigated a 28-year-old man believed to be an associate of the Blood street gang after receiving a tip that a locker at an indoor storage facility on Queensview Drive contained a .45 calibre handgun, a shotgun and a .22 calibre rifle. The guns were being stored along with thousands of dollars believed to be the proceeds of illegal drug sales, the tipster told police. After probing further, police executed a search warrant and seized a bag of guns, including several handguns, a sawed-off shotgun and about $3,000 in cash. One of the handguns — its serial number was removed but recovered by police — was traced to an alleged firearms trafficker in Alberta. The alleged gang associate in Ottawa was charged, but the charges were withdrawn after prosecutors couldn’t prove who had accessed the locker. The recent case against Osman was successful, however. His lawyer and the Crown reached a joint recommendation on his sentence: Three years in prison, minus a two-for-one credit on time served since his arrest on April 1. He also forfeited the cash. Osman, wearing an orange vest over a black T-shirt, showed no emotion during the brief court appearance and declined to address the court when given the opportunity. Agreeing with the proposed sentence, the judge said Osman had a “growing criminal record which contains several other incidents of violence,” including robbery in 2006 and resisting arrest in 2007. He was under two firearms and ammunition prohibitions when the gun was found. The weapon was not registered in Canada and was not on file as stolen, the court heard. Several other firearms-related offences Osman faced were withdrawn after he pleaded guilty to possession. Related charges against his girlfriend have also been withdrawn. She is now in Toronto, the court heard, and is pregnant with their child, due this year.

Posted in Cost of gun violence, Current Events | Tagged: , , , | Comments Off on From Ottawa Citizen, August 16, 2009, Ottawa criminals are increasingly using firearms, whether they’re smuggled from the U.S, stolen, or merely replicas. For police, it’s becoming a Gun Fight

From the Ottawa Citizen: August 16, 2009, A handgun’s deadly journey, Bought in Maine, smuggled across the border, recovered after a double homicide in Ottawa

Posted by cgccanada on August 18, 2009

On June 13, 2006, two men in an older-model four-door Mercury pulled up to Maine Military Supply in Brewer, Maine. Inside the store, one of the men, a Canadian named Andrew Porter, discreetly took a large wad of cash from his pocket and handed it to the other man, Lawrence Sears. Sears, a Maine resident, spoke to the clerk while Porter walked around the store. Sears then paid $1,427.92 in cash for eight Hi-Point pistols. He bought the handguns for Porter, who later told authorities that he had smuggled them across the border. Just over a year later, one of the guns was found by Ottawa police investigating a double homicide at a Montreal Road motel room. “There was a gun recovered and a serial number off that gun was traced back to one of these eight that was purchased in Brewer,” said Assistant U.S. Attorney Joel Casey, who worked on the illegal gun purchase cases involving Porter, who is from St. Stephen, New Brunswick, and a handful of Maine residents who bought firearms for him, including Sears. The judge was told that “we did not have any evidence that Mr. Sears or Mr. Porter knew that the gun was going to be used a year later in a homicide in Ottawa,” he said. Ottawa police won’t comment on details of the double homicide, since the man they arrested in connection with the deaths is scheduled to go to trial this fall. However, police Chief Vern White said the gun trace had uncovered a good example of the impact the activity is having on Ottawa. White, an advocate of tightening up the border and “heavier-hitting” legislation when it comes to people found guilty of transporting illegal firearms, said, “I think it’s indicative of what we see, guns coming across the border illegally that are having a direct impact on crime in this city.” Police found a bloody scene when they responded to a call about a man suffering from convulsions in the parking lot of Pari’s Motel at about 10 p.m. on June 21, 2007. Officers discovered the body of a 28-year-old man who had been shot once in the upper chest. After probing further, police discovered a second body, that of a 32-year-old man, tied to a bed in one of the hotel rooms. He had died from a gunshot wound to the head. A man was arrested in Markham in the days following the shooting. Back in the U.S., Andrew Porter and a handful of Maine residents pleaded guilty after facing several charges in connection with the illegal gun purchases, also known as “straw purchases.” A gun shop owner in Machais, Maine, contacted the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms in June 2006 to report that two men (later determined to be Sears and Porter) had tried to buy 10 guns on June 12, 2006. Porter had told the store owner that he had just moved to the area from Florida and didn’t have identification, so Sears would have to buy them for him, court documents show. Porter was arrested on Sept. 12, 2007, and told U.S. authorities that he would take handguns bought for him back to Canada, where they would be delivered to other people. Had the cases gone to trial, prosecutors expected Sears to testify that he bought 50 to 60 handguns for Porter, whom he saw hide the guns in his vehicle. Another Maine resident who worked as a gun salesman had said that Porter paid him $30 to $40 for each gun bought for him, according to documents.  Evidence entered in court shows that other Canadian police forces have seized guns that Porter brought into Canada. One handgun was recovered by Peel Regional police after an alleged street gang member flashed it to a nightclub employee during an argument, while a Saint John police officer found another pistol in the pocket of a 19-year-old man.  Last year, Porter pleaded guilty to six offences, including violation of the Arms Control Export Act, and was sentenced to 31 months in prison on each count, to be served concurrently.

Posted in Current Events | Tagged: , , | Comments Off on From the Ottawa Citizen: August 16, 2009, A handgun’s deadly journey, Bought in Maine, smuggled across the border, recovered after a double homicide in Ottawa

From Advocacynet: Elizabeth Mandelman talks about the treatment she received from the pro-gun community

Posted by cgccanada on August 17, 2009

While reflecting on the Firearms Act and my time in Canada, I feel the need to address the treatment I received from the pro-gun community this summer, specifically from members of CanadianGunNutz.com, described as Canada’s largest firearm trade and discussion forum.

According to the pro-gun community, I was in Canada trying to take away their rights.  The gunnutz community repeatedly accused me of attacking their personal freedoms, namely their freedom to carry firearms with them at all times, no matter where they are or what they are doing.  If they want to carry their gun with them to run errands or even just to buy a pack of a smokes, this should be their prerogative, is what they argued.

They told me I should be ashamed of myself based on my ‘sickening’ attempt of emotional appeal when linking gun control and domestic violence.  Newsflash, Gunnutz: Domestic violence is emotional.  It is horrifying and it is unfair.  Pretending the issue does not exist does nothing to help make it go away.

Not only did the pro-gun community constantly try attacking the legitimacy of my work and research, but they also attacked me personally; I have never experienced such degrading language or inappropriate behavior by people who claim to be adults… more

Posted in Cost of gun violence | Tagged: , , | Comments Off on From Advocacynet: Elizabeth Mandelman talks about the treatment she received from the pro-gun community

More guns in the News…

Posted by cgccanada on August 14, 2009

1. Caledon Enterprise, August 12, 2009, Caledon man facing gun charges

A 46-year-old Caledon man was arrested and charged after brandishing a handgun during a family dispute in a Walton Drive residence. Caledon OPP officers were called to the home at 10:54 p.m. on August 1 after reports that a man had taken out a handgun in the presence of three other family members, all residents of the household, according to police. The accused then fled in a brown Chrysler 300M before police arrived. Caledon and Peel Regional Police officers conducted an “extensive search” for the suspect, but the man subsequently turned himself in to police at the Bolton detachment on August 2. The handgun was later located by Caledon OPP. “It was up near a fence at a dead end around Mount Hope Road,” said Caledon OPP Staff Sergeant Operations Manager Greg Sweeney. Police would not comment on whether the accused told them the location of the gun, saying, “I can’t divulge that, but through investigation the location of the weapon was discovered.” The handgun was a registered weapon, according to Sweeney. Stephen MacGregor, 46, of Caledon, is charged with uttering a threat to cause death or bodily harm, possession of a weapon for dangerous purpose, careless use of a firearm, possession of a firearm at an unauthorized place, possession of prohibited or restricted firearm with ammunition, and breach of firearms regulation. MacGregor was held in custody and was expected to appear in court on August 3.

2. Peterborough Examiner, August 12, 2009, Man put on probation after pleading guilty to multiple firearms offences

A 50-year-old Peterborough man got probation yesterday for a number of firearms offences.  Glenn Ross pleaded guilty in Ontario Court of Justice to possessing a rifle without a licence, possessing a shotgun without a licence and carelessly storing a rifle and ammunition.  Police received a tip Ross had unauthorized weapons at his Albert St. residence, court heard. Officers executed a search warrant Dec. 31, 2008 and found a rifle, shotgun and ammunition in his apartment, court heard.  Mr. Justice Rhys Morgan gave Ross a suspended sentence, placed him on probation for one year, ordered him to complete 80 hours of community service, banned him from possessing firearms for 10 years and ordered the forfeiture of the guns.

Posted in Cost of gun violence, Current Events, news | Tagged: , , | Comments Off on More guns in the News…

National Post: After seventh fatal shooting in a month, deputy police chief laments ‘reckless’ gun culture

Posted by cgccanada on August 13, 2009

By Melissa Leong, National Post

Toronto’s deputy police chief says fighting gun violence is the force’s number one priority, but officers are stymied by a culture in which young men get status by shooting someone.

‘‘This is what really bothers me, the recklessness of the people doing the shooting,’’ said Deputy Chief Tony Warr, pictured above. ‘‘They shoot in the general direction of the target and if someone gets hit, who cares. They shoot someone, they get status. If their gun is dirty, which means they’ve shot someone with it, it means it’s a more valuable gun. That’s what we have to change. I wish I knew how to do that.’’

Homicide detectives are probing the city’s seventh fatal shooting in less than a month (click on the graphic to see more). A 22-year-old man was gunned down Monday night while riding his bike on a residential street in Rexdale. Tevane Sean Lennon’s killer fired several shots at him from a dark-coloured car with tinted windows.

He was the 18th person killed by gun violence this year, five fewer than in the same period last year. But since January, 210 people have been shot, up from 188 during the same period in 2008. Shooting occurrences are also up 20.7%, to 163 from 135 this time last year…more

Posted in Current Events | Tagged: , , , | Comments Off on National Post: After seventh fatal shooting in a month, deputy police chief laments ‘reckless’ gun culture

Morden Times, August 10, 2009, RE: Morden Times, August 6, 2009: Long-Gun Owners Not Responsible for Gun Crime in Canada”

Posted by cgccanada on August 12, 2009

See original letter here

Ms Hoeppner, ever the vigilant economist, must be concerned for Canada’s fiscal wellbeing.  What other reason could she have to take a study that laments the way that US gun control laws have facilitated gun violence in Canada through smuggling and claim that it somehow supports her attempt to abolish the long-gun registry.  The only possible explanation is that Ms. Hoeppner desperately wants criminals to be able to “Buy Canadian”.  Why let America corner an entire segment of the gun market, when you can pass a bill, such as C-391, which would pave the way for criminals to buy local.  It would be a simple process, since if the registry were to be abolished, there would be no mechanism in place linking the weapons used in crime with their legal source, and nothing to differentiate between a diverted legal Canadian gun and weapons smuggled in from elsewhere, making any attempts to investigate gun smuggling almost impossible.  There would be nothing in place linking gun owners to their firearms, and so nothing to prevent these individuals from passing their rifles and shotguns to less savoury character for a price.  It would be a profitable position, being among the ranks of straw purchasers who have to this point so beleaguered our border. Never mind the potential consequences that local sources of virtually untraceable weapons could have for public safety.  Instead, think like Ms. Hoeppner. Think of the bottom line!  Darcy Brooks

Posted in Cost of gun violence, Gun Registry | Tagged: , , | Comments Off on Morden Times, August 10, 2009, RE: Morden Times, August 6, 2009: Long-Gun Owners Not Responsible for Gun Crime in Canada”